UM System audit reveals millions in ‘inappropriate’ payments

“Inappropriate” bonus payments to university employees — totaling over $2 million — were sometimes marked as incentives but had no specific criteria, according to the Missouri state auditor in a report released Monday.

Funds were also dispersed for luxury vehicle allowances, even though a mileage reimbursement system might have been more efficient.

Read the full story from the Columbia Missourian, KOMU 8 News and the Columbia Daily Tribune.

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Sen. Blunt relocates Columbia office

Paying a visit to Republican Sen. Roy Blunt’s Columbia office this week?

Don’t head downtown — it isn’t there.

Read the story from KOMU 8 News here.

A crazy tale of justice long-delayed

Aaron Fisher has a trial date.

On April 10, the southern Missourian man, accused of sexually assaulting his 5-month-old daughter, will face a jury of his peers.

The only problem? Fisher’s first charges related to the incident (though not the ones he faces now) were brought in 2009.

That’s over seven years ago.

Fisher’s case has lasted for so long that he had to get a new public defender — in 2014, his previous one retired.

Read the latest update on Fisher’s case from KOMU 8 News.

Journalists barred from White House briefing

  • The New York Times
  • The Los Angeles Times
  • BuzzFeed News
  • Politico
  • CNN

All reputable outlets.

All blocked from covering an off-camera White House press briefing on Friday.

The Washington Times and Breitbart News, both conservative-leaning, were still allowed in.

The Associated Press and Time magazine, however, chose not to attend, citing concerns about the Trump administration’s decision to block the five outlets.

Read coverage of the issue from The New York Times, The Associated Press and NBC News.

Revisiting Columbia’s shantytown legacy

The University of Missouri has a long history of protests.

In 2015, a group of students under the banner of “Concerned Student 1950” camped out on the Carnahan Quadrangle to protest racism at the school’s flagship Columbia campus, confronting what they saw as an inappropriate silence from university officials.

Jonathan Butler, a graduate student and leader of the movement, staged a week-long hunger strike. This triggered support from the football team, which began a boycott of all sports-related activity to undergird Butler’s effort.

The national news media caught the story. Soon, the entire country had its eyes on MU.

Continue reading “Revisiting Columbia’s shantytown legacy”

Missouri’s new first lady

Who is Missouri’s new first lady?

Besides holding degrees from Harvard, Stanford and Oxford, Sheena Greitens also teaches political science at the University of Missouri.

An excellent article in this morning’s Columbia Missourian tells her story.

 

What is ‘fake news’?

Setting aside the metaphysical quandary, a potential lawsuit in Colorado could, if nothing else, set a new legal definition of the term “fake news.”

If filed, the suit would pit the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel, a local newspaper, against state Sen. Ray Scott.

Scott, a Republican, referred to an opinion column in the Sentinel as “fake news” in separate posts on Facebook and Twitter earlier this month. In defense, the paper’s publisher is considering a defamation suit, although he has yet to pursue any concrete legal action.

The story has earned national attention, perhaps due to the current political climate—the Trump administration has made it a point to assail the national news media, describing such outlets as “the enemy of the American people.