Is ‘this Trump thing’ sustainable?

5440390625_feab8a9520_b
CC BY-SA 2.0 Gage Skidmore

A piece in the Washington Post explores a freshman Kentucky congressman’s recent recess in his heavily Trump-supporting home district.

Read until the end. It’s worth your time.

Advertisements

Republicans went nuclear — now what?

Crossroads_baker_explosion.jpg
1946 nuclear test at Bikini Atoll [Public Domain]
After a Democratic filibuster of Neil Gorsuch, Congressional Republicans have exercised the “nuclear option,” dismantling the requirement of a 60-vote cloture movement before voting on Supreme Court nominees. Gorsuch can be confirmed with a mere 51 supporting senators, an up-or-down vote scheduled for Friday.

So what now?

Two law professors write in a Wall Street Journal op-ed that we should “stop worrying and learn to love the nuclear option.”

On the other hand, an opposing law professor writes a piece for U.S. News arguing that to kill the filibuster is to “kill trust in the court.”

When all is said and done, at least one thing is certain — it will have been an excellent day for C-SPAN ratings.

5 leading French presidential candidates face-off in first televised debate

Bored? Mildly curious about French politics?

Then here’s an English-dubbed version of the first French presidential debate.

In the televised debate, held Monday afternoon, five leading candidates discuss politics and policy ahead of the first round of voting on Sunday, April 23. Assuming no candidate passes 50 percent, the top two vote getters will proceed to a direct run-off on Sunday, May 7, where the winner will assume the presidency.

The five candidates, in current polling order:

  1. Marine Le Pen, far-right populist
  2. Emmanuel Macron, centrist EU supporter
  3. François Fillon, center-right former prime minister
  4. Benoît Hamon, left-wing socialist
  5. Jean-Luc Mélenchon, far-left member of the European Parliament

Watch the entire video if you dare — longer than its American counterparts, the debate clocks in at a healthy three hours and 18 minutes.

 

UM System audit reveals millions in ‘inappropriate’ payments

“Inappropriate” bonus payments to university employees — totaling over $2 million — were sometimes marked as incentives but had no specific criteria, according to the Missouri state auditor in a report released Monday.

Funds were also dispersed for luxury vehicle allowances, even though a mileage reimbursement system might have been more efficient.

Read the full story from the Columbia Missourian, KOMU 8 News and the Columbia Daily Tribune.

Sen. Blunt relocates Columbia office

Paying a visit to Republican Sen. Roy Blunt’s Columbia office this week?

Don’t head downtown — it isn’t there.

Read the story from KOMU 8 News here.

A crazy tale of justice long-delayed

Aaron Fisher has a trial date.

On April 10, the southern Missourian man, accused of sexually assaulting his 5-month-old daughter, will face a jury of his peers.

The only problem? Fisher’s first charges related to the incident (though not the ones he faces now) were brought in 2009.

That’s over seven years ago.

Fisher’s case has lasted for so long that he had to get a new public defender — in 2014, his previous one retired.

Read the latest update on Fisher’s case from KOMU 8 News.

Journalists barred from White House briefing

  • The New York Times
  • The Los Angeles Times
  • BuzzFeed News
  • Politico
  • CNN

All reputable outlets.

All blocked from covering an off-camera White House press briefing on Friday.

The Washington Times and Breitbart News, both conservative-leaning, were still allowed in.

The Associated Press and Time magazine, however, chose not to attend, citing concerns about the Trump administration’s decision to block the five outlets.

Read coverage of the issue from The New York Times, The Associated Press and NBC News.