What is the Missouri Plan?

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A view of the south side of the Missouri Capitol building in Jefferson City [Zachary Reger]
Missouri’s most notable claim-to-fame in modern legal philosophy is often overlooked.

The state’s constitutionally guaranteed system of merit-based judicial selection — the “Missouri Plan,” as it’s often called — marked a seismic shift in the process of court appointment, one that swept the nation in a grand revision of how we populate many of our appellate and high courts.

By forgoing popular alternatives of direct election and nomination-confirmation of state judges, Missouri ushered in a new “nonpartisan” era of judicial selection.

After the Plan’s initial adoption in the mid-1900s, dozens of states followed, creating merit-based systems of their own. Newly democratic nations across Europe and South America drew inspiration from the Plan in writing their own constitutions, as did even a few established democracies during historic reformation votes.

And Missouri started it all.

What follows is a brief overview of the philosophy and origins of the Missouri Plan, a lightly edited excerpt taken from my undergraduate thesis work at the University of Missouri.

Continue reading “What is the Missouri Plan?”

UM System audit reveals millions in ‘inappropriate’ payments

“Inappropriate” bonus payments to university employees — totaling over $2 million — were sometimes marked as incentives but had no specific criteria, according to the Missouri state auditor in a report released Monday.

Funds were also dispersed for luxury vehicle allowances, even though a mileage reimbursement system might have been more efficient.

Read the full story from the Columbia Missourian, KOMU 8 News and the Columbia Daily Tribune.

Sen. Blunt relocates Columbia office

Paying a visit to Republican Sen. Roy Blunt’s Columbia office this week?

Don’t head downtown — it isn’t there.

Read the story from KOMU 8 News here.

A crazy tale of justice long-delayed

Aaron Fisher has a trial date.

On April 10, the southern Missourian man, accused of sexually assaulting his 5-month-old daughter, will face a jury of his peers.

The only problem? Fisher’s first charges related to the incident (though not the ones he faces now) were brought in 2009.

That’s over seven years ago.

Fisher’s case has lasted for so long that he had to get a new public defender — in 2014, his previous one retired.

Read the latest update on Fisher’s case from KOMU 8 News.

Revisiting Columbia’s shantytown legacy

The University of Missouri has a long history of protests.

In 2015, a group of students under the banner of “Concerned Student 1950” camped out on the Carnahan Quadrangle to protest racism at the school’s flagship Columbia campus, confronting what they saw as an inappropriate silence from university officials.

Jonathan Butler, a graduate student and leader of the movement, staged a week-long hunger strike. This triggered support from the football team, which began a boycott of all sports-related activity to undergird Butler’s effort.

The national news media caught the story. Soon, the entire country had its eyes on MU.

Continue reading “Revisiting Columbia’s shantytown legacy”

Missouri’s new first lady

Who is Missouri’s new first lady?

Besides holding degrees from Harvard, Stanford and Oxford, Sheena Greitens also teaches political science at the University of Missouri.

An excellent article in this morning’s Columbia Missourian tells her story.

 

UM System gets new president

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Dr. Mun Y. Choi will serve as the 24th president of the four-campus University of Missouri System, officially stepping into the role and replacing Interim President Mike Middleton next spring.

The UM Board of Curators announced their new hire during a news conference in Jefferson City Wednesday morning. During the event, Choi spoke to the press and answered questions from reporters.

Choi will replace former system president Tim Wolfe, whose resignation was triggered by racially-charged protests at the university system’s flagship campus in Columbia last fall. The protests, which earned national media attention, also resulted in the resignation of R. Bowen Loftin, the chancellor heading the main campus.

The UM Board of Curators released a statement Monday signaling the end of their nearly year-long search for a new president. At the time, Choi was speculated as the pick, but was not officially confirmed until days later.