Missouri General Assembly kicks off 2018 legislative session

The part-time legislature will meet from January to May

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JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — The Missouri legislature is back in session, ushering in a new year of conflict, compromise and co-operation.

State lawmakers traveled to the capital this week for the start of the second regular session of the 99th Missouri General Assembly. Session officially began Wednesday afternoon.

In the Senate, newly elected Sen. Mike Cierpiot was sworn in by the chief justice of the Missouri Supreme Court. The Lee’s Summit Republican takes over from former Sen. Will Kraus in representing the 8th Senatorial District. Kraus, also a Republican, resigned from the Senate when Gov. Eric Greitens appointed him to the Missouri Tax Commission last summer.

Another Kansas City-area Republican, Sen. Ryan Silvey, is also leaving the Senate. On Tuesday, the governor appointed Silvey to the state’s Public Service Commission. A confirmation hearing was held Thursday morning for Kraus and Silvey, with both receiving full Senate confirmation shortly thereafter.

Silvey, though of the same party as the state’s chief executive, was a vocal critic of the governor. As a senator, Silvey was often a thorn in Greitens’ side during last year’s legislative session. As the Kansas City Star reports:

Silvey routinely criticized Greitens’ reliance on so-called dark money — campaign contributions routed through nonprofits to conceal the origin of the money. He was part of a bipartisan group of senators who called for the creation of a special legislative committee to investigate whether the governor engaged in illegal activity during his 2016 campaign as well as during his time as governor.

“We can no longer turn a blind eye to the unprecedented games being played by Gov. Greitens and his political machine,” Silvey said last year. “You can’t ignore possible unethical behavior by the governor or his campaign, just because you share the same party label. Missourians deserve to know what happened and it’s the duty of the Senate to find out.”

During the opening session, the Senate addressed a few housekeeping duties and offered a preview of what’s to come. Republican Sens. Rob Schaaf and Gary Romine vowed to oppose confirmation of five gubernatorial appointments to the State Board of Education — the same members who, in December, voted to fire former Education Commissioner Margie Vandeven. The governor later withdrew his interim appointees, then resubmitted them Wednesday as in-session nominees, giving the Senate more time to act on their confirmation but meanwhile removing them from the board.

On Thursday, Democratic Sen. Jamilah Nasheed brought up the costs of opposing the nominees, saying doing so might have the effect of shutting down the Education Board until May. Without the five appointees, the board lacks a quorum to conduct business. Sen. Romine said the board’s hiatus would be unfortunate but bearable, and that the governor could remedy the situation by selecting nominees that are less controversial.

In Wednesday’s end-of-day press conference, Senate Republicans, who currently hold a super-majority in the chamber, addressed potential changes to the Missouri tax code, measures to stimulate economic development and working with the governor to improve state infrastructure.

Democratic leadership discussed filing amendments to last year’s Senate Bill 43, which raised the bar for proving workplace discrimination and altered whistle-blower protections. Sen. Gina Walsh, the minority leader, criticized the governor’s controversial Education Board appointments, but said she cannot speak for other members of her party.

As part of my duties as a multimedia specialist for the Missouri Senate, I compiled a short video on the start of the new session. The package features Cierpiot’s swearing-in and quotes from Senate leadership during Wednesday’s press conference.

Author: Zachary Reger

A graduate of the University of Missouri with degrees in journalism, philosophy and film studies, Zach's primary interests lie in political reporting, media production and social philosophy.

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